cocosori kickstarter

CoCoSoRi’s Crowdfunded Comeback

CocoSori are a Korean pop duo who first came to our attention in 2016 with the release of their first single Dark Circle. The video featured the duo wearing Atsuko Kudo maids’ uniforms in pink and turquoise:

 

 

CoCoSoRi would go on to perform live numerous times in the same costumes, sometimes in red or black variants:

 

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For some months all was quiet on their channel, until last week when they announced they had taken to Kickstarter in an effort to fund a new music video. At the time of writing, they have already exceeded their ¥2,000,000 ($17,388) goal with 12 days to go. The Kickstarter page itself is in Japanese, but check out the pitch below also in English:

 

 

We congratulate the girls on their successful campaign, though with a slight pang of loss we note that as part of their funding drive the group offered up their latex outfits as rewards for the higher brackets, and these have all been snapped up. And with that, it looks like this is the last we’ll see of the iconic dresses. But who knows, with 12 days to go if the campaign meets some stretch goals maybe there’ll be enough extra cash to fund another trip to London and another Atsuko Kudo shopping spree?!

Watch below to see CoCoSoRi’s original visit to AK for fittings for the famous maid uniforms:

 

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The Adorned: Nange Magro on CNN

As CNN describes it, The Adorned is a series of short films which “explores the psychology behind extraordinary style”. In these videos, you can find eccentric characters wearing even more eccentric clothing. Elaborate, individual, and eye-catching, the people in these videos often find clothing and dressing up as self-expression and an art form itself, painting life in big, colourful letters. For some, it’s a way of finding inner strength and affirming who they are.

Does any of that sound familiar, latex lovers?

Nange Magro, the designer of Dead Lotus Couture is one of the subjects, and she talks about her background and the influences which led to her creating her unique latex creations, which combine elegance with the theatrical. She also describes the sense of belonging which she feels in being part of the alternative & fetish communities, finding them a welcoming and accepting environment for self-expression to flourish in all its forms.

The video naturally shows her wearing her designs, and also captures well the material’s qualities, such as its unique sound, and with multiple close ups of its high-gloss surface. There is also a ‘transforming’ dress, which is a sight to behold in itself:

http://edition.cnn.com/style/article/the-adorned-nange-magro/index.html

I recommend watching the whole series of films, because they are full of positive and inspiring view points, and they expound the philosophy of finding the theatre in life, and playing exactly the role we feel we were born to play, whatever it might be.

 

Every time I wear an outfit that I made and that is in latex I feel much more myself…you feel more powerful, like you affirm who you are.

Nange Magro

There’s a fear of being different, but we are all different inside in one way or the other, so what’s wrong with expressing that difference in the way you present yourself to the world?

Artist Sue Kreitzman, who is battling the beige and the bland by going out in wearable works of art

It is giving full reign to enjoy the opulence of the mind and thinking; That is expressed through the way I dress.

Tyne O’Connell

I see my outfits a lot of the time as kind of armour…I don’t think there’s any point in blending in.

Daniel Lismore

 

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latexfashion tv challenges

Could you wear latex every day, in public?

Could you wear latex every day for a week? Or maybe just one day, but for every hour between waking and sleeping? These were the challenges set by LatexFashionTV to alternative models Maizy Marzipan and Katex respectively. But that doesn’t mean simply wearing latex around the house – no, that’s far too easy. Maizy and Katex had to wear latex going about their usual lives: out and about in public, meeting friends for coffee or drinks – even attending a job interview!

As part of the challenge, the models vlogged about their experiences. Take a look:

 

 

The overarching theme is latex in public, and the reactions it inspires among strangers or friends, the outcome here being positive or (contrary to expectation) wholly neutral. The issue of comfort is also addressed, both in the physical sense and in the sense of confidence and self-consciousness. On the material side, latex is often perceived as uncomfortable, and I believe this is a major misconception about latex which is knocked down here. Regarding the self-image aspect: the wearers’ confidence can, of course, depend on the reactions of others. But I also believe there’s some two-way traffic here, such that a confident, casual attitude can go some way to normalising the outfits, which can relax the attitudes of those around.

Overall, the message is positive and inspiring, whether that be being at ease with your style, however unusual (as Maizy says “I’m gonna rock this!”); being encouraged to push the boat out, or reinforcing an existing love for latex by putting it out there, in big letters.

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Former Buddhist nun turns to latex

After 10 years devotion to the mind and spirituality, Damcho Dyson came to the realisation that the mind is not isolated from the corporeal, and rather they are integral to one another. Curiously, in hanging up her robes this journey of reconnection with her body has led her to the wearing of latex.

The story is a curious one because of Damcho Dyson’s background, but her rationale and explanation of how latex makes one mindful of one’s own body will sound familiar to anyone with experience of dressing in the material.

Describing the first time she tried on a latex corset:

The sensation was far beyond what I was expecting and I immediately felt hooked. It enhanced, and even empowered the feeling of being in the body. It was armor like and cocoon like whilst holding me securely like a determined hug.

 

In acting like a second skin, latex (especially skin-tight latex) makes the wearer continually aware of its total and constant embrace of the body, and as a consequence those parts of the body which it encloses are brought forward into the consciousness. It’s hard to forget you are wearing latex, nor which parts of your body it’s touching.

In fact, as Damcho Dyson points out, latex goes even further and can actually amplify touch sensation:

Experientially, both [robes and latex] are immersive and take some commitment and conviction to wear. Whilst the yards of layered fabric of Tibetan monastic robes shroud the body, tight fitting latex — sometimes referred to by wearers as a second skin — reveals the body. The former almost anaesthetises the wearer against identifying with the shape and form of the body […] Whilst the latter enhances the form both through its fit and also through the way in which the ‘second skin’ amplifies touch sensation.

 

The full interview is fascinating, and Damcho Dyson draws further comparisons and contrasts between monastic practice and dressing in latex, including in ritual and meditation. Read at the Huffington Post here.

image credit: Graham Price