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Former Buddhist nun turns to latex

After 10 years devotion to the mind and spirituality, Damcho Dyson came to the realisation that the mind is not isolated from the corporeal, and rather they are integral to one another. Curiously, in hanging up her robes this journey of reconnection with her body has led her to the wearing of latex.

The story is a curious one because of Damcho Dyson’s background, but her rationale and explanation of how latex makes one mindful of one’s own body will sound familiar to anyone with experience of dressing in the material.

Describing the first time she tried on a latex corset:

The sensation was far beyond what I was expecting and I immediately felt hooked. It enhanced, and even empowered the feeling of being in the body. It was armor like and cocoon like whilst holding me securely like a determined hug.

 

In acting like a second skin, latex (especially skin-tight latex) makes the wearer continually aware of its total and constant embrace of the body, and as a consequence those parts of the body which it encloses are brought forward into the consciousness. It’s hard to forget you are wearing latex, nor which parts of your body it’s touching.

In fact, as Damcho Dyson points out, latex goes even further and can actually amplify touch sensation:

Experientially, both [robes and latex] are immersive and take some commitment and conviction to wear. Whilst the yards of layered fabric of Tibetan monastic robes shroud the body, tight fitting latex — sometimes referred to by wearers as a second skin — reveals the body. The former almost anaesthetises the wearer against identifying with the shape and form of the body […] Whilst the latter enhances the form both through its fit and also through the way in which the ‘second skin’ amplifies touch sensation.

 

The full interview is fascinating, and Damcho Dyson draws further comparisons and contrasts between monastic practice and dressing in latex, including in ritual and meditation. Read at the Huffington Post here.

image credit: Graham Price